goatcorporation
goatcorporation:

besturlonhere:

pbstv:

Meet Lucy, a 3.2 million-year-old ancestor of ours. Though she looks like an ape, her knees were close together, just like a human’s! That positioned her feet directly under her body and made walking easier. 
See the final installment of Your Inner Fish tomorrow night (4/23) on PBS at 10/9c.

ok i will

this looks less like a walk and more like a dance. some kind of shuffle

goatcorporation:

besturlonhere:

pbstv:

Meet Lucy, a 3.2 million-year-old ancestor of ours. Though she looks like an ape, her knees were close together, just like a human’s! That positioned her feet directly under her body and made walking easier. 

See the final installment of Your Inner Fish tomorrow night (4/23) on PBS at 10/9c.

ok i will

this looks less like a walk and more like a dance. some kind of shuffle

goatcorporation

samdesantis:

Puppies discovered a new part of the yard!

scientificillustration

biomedicalephemera:

"All his life he tried to be a good person. Many times, however, he failed.
For after all, he was only human. He wasn’t a dog.” - Charles M. Schultz

There are over 400 million dogs in the world today. Most breeds are only a few hundred years old, many even younger than that. Some, however, derive from the most ancient stock. There are several primary “types” that gave rise to our current breeds. Today, the Fédération Cynologique Internationale classifies all breeds into ten groups.

  1. Sheepdogs and Cattle Dogs
  2. Pinschers and Schnauzers, Molossoids and Swiss Mountain Dogs
  3. Terriers
  4. Dachshunds
  5. Spitz and Primitive Types
  6. Scenthounds
  7. Pointers and Setters
  8. Retrievers, Flushing Dogs and Water Dogs
  9. Companion and Toy Dogs
  10. Sighthounds

The Book of Dogs: An Intimate Study of Mankind’s Best Friend. Ernest Harold Baynes and Louis Agassiz Fuertes for the National Geographic Society, 1919.